Field Chatter | ARP9 for new Best SMG

The ARP-9 by G&G Armament occupies an interesting space in the airsoft market. It is designed to offer close quarters battle options to players who want the ergonomics of an AR-15 but don’t want to own “just another M4” while simultaneously trying to combat the more expensive offerings from competing brands. This gun was one of the stand-out new showings from G&G at SHOTshow 2017 as well, garnering a ton of hype and curiosity, but just how good is it? How does it compare to some of its direct competition? We had to know, and we think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

arp9 g and g airsoft gun aeg smg

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Field Chatter | JAG ARMS Shotgun Review – Best Gas Shotgun?

Time and time again, players will ask us for our favorite guns. Many times that begins with a long list of your standard fare of rifles; be it the M4, the AK-47, or the G36 style of airsoft gun. Often, these guns are purely separated by their external characteristics and perform identically to one another. Shotguns have always managed to differentiate themselves via their typically tri-shot performance; however the often cheap materials have always kept them from reaching “must-have” status. The JAG Arms Shotguns are here to settle that score, and prove once and for all that airsoft shotguns are here to outperform your expectations and steal that must-have slot away from some of your more coveted airsoft replicas.

Jag Arms Shotgun TS GBB

JAG Arms TS Shotgun

The first thing to cover about the JAG shotguns is their quality externals. Each model in the line has full metal external construction on the receiver itself, the barrel, and the magazine tube (although this is cosmetic as on other tri-shot guns) with polymer pumps on all models. The full stock models utilize a polymer stock as well, which house the gas cartridge, while the collapsible stock models sit a plastic LE style stock on a metal buffer tube, which serves as your gas chamber which you fill via the valve located on the buffer tube itself. Each model features a metal picatinny rail to attach optics while the TSS and SP models also feature a metal side saddle for holding additional shells (and if that weren’t enough, even include a few extra shells in the box as well). It is rounded off with a safety switch nestled quietly behind the trigger in a traditional position for a shotgun.

 

Click Here to see more details, and a 200 ft shot!
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The Arsenal – Zach’s Scratch Built MK18 Mod 1

Zach here. Check the vid below to see a run down on my “go-to” gun, my MK18 Mod 1. Included below will be links to products that I added to this rifle over time to increase the reliability, performance and feel of my airsoft gun to get out of it exactly what I wanted.

For those curious, the batteries I use are 11.1v lithium polymer batteries of varying MAH ratings. The battery fits inside the buffer tube with the rear wiring and connector all in place. The base external build for this gun was a Cybergun Licensed King Arms Colt M4A1.

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New Affordable Line of AEG’s with a MOSFETS?

In recent years, MOSFETs have become somewhat of a staple in airsoft guns. Companies have been slowly incorporating MOSFETs into all of guns. Now-a-days you expect to hear them included with Krytac, VFC, Classic Army, and G&G. One you wouldn’t think of is King Arms. They have just released their KA TWS Ultra Grade M4 Series. Here are some of the features!

External Build:

  • Zinc Alloy/Nylon Fiber Body and RIS
  • Metal Outer Barrel
  • Metal Trigger Guard
  • Metal Buffer Tube
  • Metal Selector Switch
  • Metal Magazine Release
  • Functional Charging Handle
  • Ergo Pistol Grip
  • Troy Style Iron Sights and Battle Axe Stock

Internal Build:

  • 7mm Bearings
  • 18:1 Gears
  • Standard MOSFET
  • Poly-carbonate Piston
  • Version 2 Gearbox Shell
  • 18000 RPM Motor (estimated)
  • Quick Change Spring System

 

All of the internals will be the same across all models (given the FPS will vary due to size differences). We test fired the Type 3 Model with an 11.1V 20C Battery. We found the trigger response to be very snappy. After shooting about 100 rounds, the MOSFET kicked in and prevented the gun from burning out. The 11.1V battery proved to be too much for the gun, but the MOSFET prevented any damage the gun could have taken. With a 7.4V 20C Battery and a 9.6V 1600mAh battery, the gun performed flawlessly. The gun was very light weight, which made it easier to manage. I did find that the Troy style stock would dig into the had grabbing the pistol grip when completely collapsed, but had no problems when in every other position. The standard internals do leave room for improvement in terms of performance, but they are still of good quality and will perform very well for a while. With the quick change spring system, you can bring the gun up to 400FPS and take it outdoors. Over all, this series of guns are a very good and affordable choice for a starting gun.

 

Painting It Right – Part 1: Materials and Getting Started

Hello Airsofters; Chris here from the GI Virginia store. In this post I wanted to run through a quick step-by-step about the proper way to paint your Airsoft guns, and things to both do and avoid if you decide to give your blaster a little extra personality. This first blog post will cover more or less just the basics of painting, mostly about what kind of paints to buy and how to go about the beginning process of laying a good base coat on your replica.

First and foremost, do understand that painting any part of your gun does generally void any warranties from manufacturers. I usually recommend waiting the 30-90 days for the warranty to run its course before I spray my gun. This ensures that if anything goes wrong with the gun right off the bat, you can get the issues taken care of as easily and seamlessly as possible. Also please keep in mind that removing or painting the orange tip of most guns also accomplishes the warranty being voided, so tread carefully or accept your fate before you get started.

Step One; Buying Paint

With that out of the way, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty. The biggest part of painting your rifle is selecting the right paint for what you need. If you want to do a more modern, military focused paint job, or really any paint scheme that doesn’t look like something from Stargate, you’re going to want to buy a very specific type of paint. Specifically, Krylon or Rustoleum Camouflage paints. Anything labeled Ultra-Flat is exactly what you’re looking for. The number of colors offered in these ultra flat finishes is limited, usually, to tans, greens, and browns. Keep that in mind when you do your shopping. PS; don’t forget to paint to your surroundings. Think about where you normally play and what kind of foliage and colors exist in that space when you buy your colors.

Rustoleum and Krylon flat colors make the best for spray painting camo patterns for your guns.

The full suite of Rustoleum Camouflage paints. These have always been my go-to.

The Pattern for Painting

Now, the most important decision you make will be what pattern you decide to put on your gun. Don’t forget that the end goal of any camouflage, either on your clothes or your gun, is to disrupt the outline of the shape. A gun is a very recognizable silhouette, so keep this in mind when you spray your patterns onto your blasters. Once you’ve decided on a pattern and color scheme, all that’s left is to gather materials, tape up what needs to be protected, and get it started.

Typical Painting supplies can be found at most "big box" stores including Walmart, Home Depot, Lowes, etc...

Painters tape, a brush or sponge, and some different sized mesh will help you along the way nicely. Camo netting, like the material on the left, can be purchased for cheap at most surplus stores. For larger mesh, I suggest finding laundry bags

Taping it off

Taping up the gun is important, as the process will keep important areas of the gun protected and paint free. This includes any and all attachments you don’t want painted, including glass on optics, flashlights and lasers. Also keep in mind that the inner barrel of your gun needs to be stuffed and taped up at the end. I recommend just shoving some shop towel or paper towel into your muzzle to absorb and block the paint. Tape that down to ensure it doesn’t shift out of place.

After this, tape up your trigger, should you wish to do so, and tape up any trademarks you want to keep covered. Also remember to either insert a magazine into the gun to be painted simultaneously, or tape up the magazine well to protect your hop up unit, if you choose to leave your inner barrel installed during painting. Some people prefer to take out the gearbox of their gun to ensure no paint touches it, but realistically, as long as your dust cover is closed then you should be good to go without affecting performance.

Photo pulled from Google Images to display taping off of firearm.

A good example of some finished taping work

The Process for Painting

Some people prefer to hang their guns to produce a more consistent product from side to side on the gun. Laying the gun down on a flat surface, however, will do in a pinch. First up, decide on your base coat color, and apply a very light coat from about a foot away. Sweep the can from side to side while pulsing the button to release paint. Think about shooting the spray paint on semi automatic as opposed to full auto. Holding the button down and spraying the gun will result in thick, sticky paint that could potentially show runs. This will produce a pretty poor looking finished product.

Remember that this initial base coat isn’t really about coloring the gun; it’s more or less just giving the next few layers something to stick to as you go forward. After your base coat is applied to both sides and has been given time to dry, apply a second coat of the same color, going perhaps a tiny bit darker on this one in order to ensure your base color shows through the next couple layers you’ll be applying on top. Allow this coat to dry.

On the next blog, we’ll be talking about putting pattern on guns. Also, we will discuss what kind of materials to use to produce the effects that you want.

Need to pick a gun to get started? How to Pick the Best Beginner Gun

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